New Zealand

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Articles on current developments, compiled by Tim Beal.

NZ-DPRK Society
The official website of the NZ-DPRK Society, working to increase awareness, understanding and contact †between the people† of†New Zealand and the DPRK


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OCTOBER 2009
  • Report on doing business in South Korea launched
    A new Asia:NZ report, South Korea: An Opportunity for New Zealand Business, was launched on 21 October in Wellington. Hosted by Deloitte, the event attracted a cross section of influential voices in New Zealand business and government, as well as a number of South Korean officials based in New Zealand. Dr Andrew Butcher, Asia:NZ Director, Research and Policy, welcomed the guests and introduced the speakers. The research project was undertaken by Deloitte and led by Partner Alasdair MacLeod (pictured left, with James Penn). Mr MacLeod explained that they ďwere determined that the report be written in plain English in order for it to be accessible to and resonate better with a wide business audience.Ē He noted that the key messages from the report for businesses in New Zealand entering the Korea market were that they need to build their market understanding, be the right scale, establish the right relationships and recognise, acknowledge and embrace the Koreaís culture. [FTA]
  • South Korea: an opportunity for New Zealand business
    The research has identified that to be successful in South Korea, New Zealand businesses need to: ē build market understanding, ē be the right scale, ē establish the right relationships, and ē to recognise, acknowledge and embrace the Korean culture.
  • Korea Report September
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington

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SEPTEMBER 2009
  • NZ agents join secret war in Afghanistan
    4:00AM Wednesday Sep 09, 2009 By Patrick Gower The Government has secretly been sending intelligence operatives to take part in the war in Afghanistan. The Herald has learned New Zealand's contribution to the war against the Taleban has included an "intelligence" component, separate from the military commitment. Intelligence usually refers to the work done by spy agencies such as the Security Intelligence Service (SIS) and Government Security Communications Bureau (GCSB). Prime Minister John Key, who is responsible for the agencies, refused to comment last night. It is not known whose command the intelligence operatives are under, or what role they have been playing in the war. Possibilities range from spying amid the Afghan community to high-end communications interception. Their presence was revealed in a review of New Zealand's commitment to Afghanistan released under the Official Information Act yesterday. The review lists intelligence as a contribution alongside the military, aid and police. It also shows New Zealand is committed to two secret "non-military support roles", although details of the roles and how many operatives are involved have been removed because it would "prejudice the security or defence of New Zealand or the international relations of the Government of New Zealand".

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AUGUST 2009
  • New Zealand Lawmakerís Day of Diplomacy in Korea
    New Zealand lawmaker Melissa Lee speaks to an audience of New Zealanders and Koreans at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, last Tuesday. / Courtesy of Edge Communication By Kim Se-jeong Staff Reporter Last Tuesday at the Grand Hyatt Seoul, New Zealanders in Korea got together to see one of their lawmakers doing diplomacy with Korea. It couldn't be better, for Melissa Lee has a Korean background, understanding the culture, customs and language. She said she joined the New Zealand Parliament from the national list member in 2008, the equivalent to a proportional representation lawmaker. Born in Korea but brought up in New Zealand, she spoke on topics that appealed to both the New Zealand and Korean members of the audience. And she carried it out in a frank and straightforward manner that kept the guests attentive during her rather long speech.
    Speaking Korean almost fluently, she switched back and forth between English and Korean during the speech ? from time to time embarrassing the interpreter who was there to help her.
  • Korea Report July
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • New Zealand's 1st Korean MP
    Nov. 8, 2008 was a memorable day for a Korean New Zealander Melissa Lee. In the general election that day, Lee became the first Korean immigrant to get into parliament on the ruling National Party list.

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JULY 2009
  • Don Borrie calls for US military withdrawal from ROK
    Despite the cessation of hostilities at the end of the Korean War, 27 July, 1953, Peace has never been formally agreed to. The Armistice Agreement is only a ceasefire which can be broken at any time. A major stumbling block to Peace has been the insistence of the United States to maintain an active military presence in South Korea, a presence which maintains a stance of military readiness to advance into the DPRK if the opportunity arose. The annual military exercises involving the US and ROK military have been consistently aggressive in nature.
    (Statement by Rev Don Borrie)
  • Korea Report June
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington

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JUNE 2009
  • Co-operation on Migratory Birds
    Background In November 2007, the then New Zealand Minister of Foreign Affairs Winston Peters, visited Pyongyang. Among the topics he discussed was the plummeting populations of migratory birds and the possibility of a team of ornithologists from NZ visiting DPRK to undertake field survey research work. Facilitated by the NZ-DPRK Society, further discussions and planning took place during 2008. Agreement was reached that a team from the Miranda Naturalist Trust would visit in April 2009 to undertake a field survey of migratory birds alongside DPRK scientists.
  • Korea-New Zealand Hold FTA Talks in Seoul
    Korea and New Zealand kicked off their week-long first round of free trade negotiations in Seoul Monday. The two sides agreed on basic terms of reference during preliminary talks held in April. This first round of talks is expected to focus on discovering each sideís points of interest. New Zealand is Korea's number one lumber importing country while meat and dairy products are also popular imported items to Korea. Korea's main exports to the island country are mostly gasoline, automobiles and telecommunication devices. Currently Korea's 48th largest trading partner, New Zealand can not be described as one of the country's key business partners. However, this also means that there is still plenty of room left for improvement.

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MAY 2009
  • Korea Report May
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • NZ-DPRK Society media release on DPRK nuclear test
    The second nuclear test by the DPRK (North Korea) on 25 May 2009 is highly regrettable but must be viewed within the context of the deteriorating relationship with the ROK (South Korea) and Japan and the lack of a coherent and positive policy by the incoming Obama administration. The test is clearly a reiteration of North Koreaís message to successive American administrations to engage in meaningful bilateral negotiations to resolve issues between the two countries to produce a peaceful and normal relationship, free of sanctions and military threats.
  • NZ condemns North Korean nuclear test
    Foreign Minister Murray McCully today condemned reports of a nuclear weapons test by North Korea Ė the second such test in the past two and a half years. ďTodayís test, if confirmed, is another provocative act by North Korea that risks destabilising the Korean peninsula. It is also a significant step backwards for global nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation efforts,Ē Mr McCully said. [test]
  • Teaching English in N.K.
    "I am apolitical. I want to make it clear that I am not anti-American and definitely not a Stalinist crank. The reasons for going to (the Democratic People's Republic of Korea) were humanitarian." Tim Kearns taught English in Pyongyang for two years. Why would anyone teach English in a place considered so dangerous? Wages for English instructors in South Korea are among the highest in the world. Many other countries offer financial and cultural rewards. But North Korea? Kearns said he went to North Korea because he wanted to do volunteer work in a country that is not as well off as his own. "I went to teach the students to the best of my ability and I didn't take my eyes off that focus," said the New Zealander. "Getting into politics and cloak and dagger stuff was never my gig. I just wanted to help and befriend the people." There are very few English teachers in North Korea. The New Zealand/DPRK Friendship Society - which laid the groundwork for sending Kearns to North Korea - plans to send more teachers. The British Society now has four teacher trainers in Pyongyang. By comparison, there are more than 10,000 native speakers of English teaching in South Korea and as least as many in Japan and China. [Training]

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APRIL 2009
  • U.S.-New Zealand Arrangement For Cooperation On Nonproliferation Assistance
    Bureau of Public Affairs Office of the Spokesman Washington, DC April 7, 2009
    Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and New Zealand Foreign Minister Murray McCully signed on April 7, 2009, an arrangement for cooperation on nonproliferation assistance. This arrangement supports collaborative work between the United States and New Zealand to secure nuclear and radioactive materials that could be used in a nuclear or radiological weapon and to detect and deter illicit trafficking in these materials by improving monitoring capabilities at priority border crossings, airports, and seaports. Through this arrangement, New Zealand has pledged to provide NZ$685,000 (approximately US$350,000) to support the U.S. Department of Energyís National Nuclear Security Administrationís Second Line of Defense program in equipping Kazakhstanís borders with radiation monitors and providing related infrastructure and training. This contribution builds on the success of a similar arrangement signed in May 2007, through which New Zealand contributed similar assistance to help secure Ukraineís border. This arrangement reflects the common conviction on the part of the Governments of the United States and New Zealand that nuclear smuggling is a global threat that requires a coordinated, global response. Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister McCully have agreed to sign this document today because of the high priority that the United States and New Zealand both place on nonproliferation cooperation. This contribution results from the efforts of the U.S. Governmentís Nuclear Smuggling Outreach Initiative (NSOI), a Department of State-led program that also involves the Department of Energyís National Nuclear Security Administration and several other U.S. agencies. NSOI engages nations most at risk of nuclear smuggling to jointly identify steps to improve their capabilities to combat that threat. NSOI then works with international donors to identify and coordinate funding to help the vulnerable countries address their needs. New Zealand is one of eleven partners that has joined the United States in supporting anti-nuclear smuggling projects through NSOI. For more information on the Nuclear Smuggling Outreach Initiative, go to www.nsoi-state.net. [Proliferation] [Tribute]
  • Nth Korean invite set to 'open doors'
    By NICOLA BRENNAN - Waikato Times Last updated 05:00 28/03/2009 Wintec is looking to expand its international links with one of the world's most secretive countries North Korea. Chief executive Mark Flowers and English lecturer Richard Lawrence leave for the East Asian country next Thursday. Mr Flowers' wife Lynnette will also accompany them at her own expense. Mr Flowers said he was "slightly surprised" when he received the invitation from North Korea's Ministry of Culture. "It's not a country I would have actually thought of," he said. "But we hope it will be good for Wintec." Mr Flowers said he was not sure exactly what the trip would entail, as they had not received an itinerary, but he expected to spend at least one of his three days visiting several tertiary institutions.
  • Flowers germinates N Korean link
    Wintec Chief Executive Mark Flowers visits N Korea
  • Korea Report April
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Rising Golf Star Danny Lee Turns Pro
    Danny Lee "The Masters made me realize what golf means to me. From now on, I will try to take golfing to a higher level as a professional," says Danny Lee, the 19-year-old Korean New Zealander who became the youngest winner of the U.S. Amateur title last year and the Johnnie Walker Classic in Perth in February. Lee made it official that he is turning professional on Wednesday.

    The way forward is through quiet diplomacy, aid, trade, and investment together with a formal declaration of peace
    Don Borrie comments on the Dominion Post editorial on the DPRK launch
    Dear Editor,
    †I agree with the editorial on North Korea (April 8)which describes Kim Jong Il as having ďplayed a skilled handĒ with the recent attempted satellite launch.
    Longstanding western sanctions have meant that North Korea has very few cards to play with. The rocket launch brought the DPRK back on to the front page at a time when it has been looking as though President Obama was leaving the Korean issue to go on the back burner.
    For well over a decade the North Koreans have been calling for the normalisation of relations with the US . This is the key to achieving a lasting peace in Korea. As long as the nuclear armed US ducks from this request by diverting attention to the †danger of North Korean nuclear technology the present angry posture of the DPRK will remain.
    Rather than wielding sticks the way forward is through quiet diplomacy, aid ,trade and investment together with a formal declaration of peace.
    New Zealand is well positioned to promote this approach.

    Don Borrie
    Chairman, NZ DPRK Society.

  • Editorial: North Korea's dangerous game
    The Dominion Post Last updated 05:00 08/04/2009 Confronted by North Korea's long-range rocket launch, the United Nations Security Council has done what it usually does in a crisis - nothing.
    Russia's ambassador to the UN has warned against an "emotional knee-jerk reaction" and China's foreign minister wants offended nations to look at all sides of the picture and avoid taking actions that might exacerbate the situation. Both countries have signalled that they will use their veto power to oppose any new sanctions on North Korea. [Satellite]

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MARCH 2009
  • An Ďunlimitedí supply of all things New Zealand in April
    March 17, 2009 From left: Graeme Solloway, trade commissioner of New Zealand Trade and Enterprise; Ambassador Richard Mann; a kiwi mascot; and Shaun Conroy, Northeast Asia director at NZTE. By Park Sun-young The largest-ever New Zealand cultural festival, dubbed ďNew Zealand Unlimited,Ē will be held on April 4-5 at COEX, in southern Seoul. The island nationís government is using the event to provide a unique opportunity for people here in Korea to experience New Zealand, ranging from its foods, wines and culture to cutting-edge technology. ďNew Zealand prides itself on having a rich, vibrant and innovative culture which the Korean public can experience as part of ĎNew Zealand Unlimited,íĒ said New Zealand Ambassador Richard Mann, who started his assignment in Seoul late last month.
  • NZ Unlimited
  • Korea Report March
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • 'Kiwi' Who Defends the Rights of Native English Teachers
    The Association for Teachers of English in Korea, a group for the protection of rights of some 25,000 native English-speaking teachers in Korea from seven Anglophone countries, was launched on Wednesday. These teachers, mostly from Canada, New Zealand and the United States, are working in Korea on one-year E-2 visas. A 27-year-old middle-school teacher, Tom Rainey-Smith, the group's first president, said "ATEK will be committed to protecting the rights of native English teachers within Korea's legal framework." Currently, some 400 people have applied for membership.
  • Hyundai i30 Diesel Elite Voted Best Car in New Zealand
    The Hyundai i30 Diesel Elite has been chosen best car in New Zealand. The Automobile Association of New Zealand announced on Friday that of the 53 cars nominated, Hyundaiís i30 has won this yearís AA Supreme Motoring Excellence award, having already topped the compact car category. †
  • Korea to Benchmark New Zealand Farming Reforms
    President Lee Myung-bak met with New Zealand Prime Minister John Key and visited the New Zealand Institute for Crop & Food Research during a visit to the country on Tuesday. Lee expressed determination to push for drastic reform of the agricultural sector benchmarking New Zealand by gradually reducing subsidies to farmers. "Agriculture reform was added to the agenda for the summit in the last minute," said a key official at Cheong Wa Dae, "Visible measures on agricultural reform will be taken by the government in the near future." New Zealand has established a market-oriented competitive agricultural structure by drastically cutting or abolishing government subsidies since 1984.
  • Korea, New Zealand open FTA negotiations
    March 04, 2009 President Lee Myung-bak gets a Maori-style greeting from Chief Petty Officer Miru McLean upon arrival at Government House in Auckland, New Zealand yesterday.By Oh Jong-taek Korea and New Zealand yesterday announced the official beginning of bilateral free trade negotiations following a summit meeting between President Lee Myung-bak and New Zealand Prime Minister John Key. Lee met with Key in Auckland yesterday and they agreed on a wide range of cooperation issues such as trade, technology, agricultural reform and youth exchanges.
  • Lee Begins Visit to New Zealand
    South Korea's first lady Kim Yun-ok doing the hongi kiss, the traditional Maori greeting, using noses, with a Maori warrior during a welcoming ceremony at the residence of Governor General Anand Satyanand in Auckland, New Zealand, Tuesday. / Yonhap South Korean President Lee Myung-bak Tuesday began his two-day visit to New Zealand with a ceremony hosted by New Zealand's governor general. The South Korean President is scheduled to meet New Zealand Prime Minister John Key in a summit to discuss ways to increase cooperation in fighting the global economic crisis, according to Yonhap News. They are also expected to declare the official start of negotiations for a free trade agreement (FTA), according to South Korean officials here.

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FEBRUARY 2009
  • President to Visit Australia, NZ, Indonesia
    By Na Jeong-ju Staff Reporter President Lee Myung-bak will begin a seven-day trip to New Zealand, Australia and Indonesia early next month, during which he will meet with leaders of the countries to discuss ways to strengthen economic cooperation, Cheong Wa Dae said Wednesday. South Korea will officially announce the start of free trade deal talks with New Zealand and Australia after Lee's summit with New Zealand's Prime Minister John Key, March 3, and Australia's Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, March 5, the presidential office said.
  • Korea Report February
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington

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JANUARY 2009
  • Korea Report January
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • S. Korea, New Zealand agree to cooperate in energy, tech, culture
    SEOUL, Jan 26, 2009 (Asia Pulse Data Source via COMTEX) -- South Korea and New Zealand agreed Sunday to strengthen cooperation in energy, technology and cultural sectors in a bid to foster more productive relations between the two countries, Seoul officials said. The agreement was made earlier between New Zealand's foreign minister Murray McCully and South Korea's Foreign Affairs and Trade Minister Yu Myung-hwan who is currently visiting the country, according to ministry officials.
  • Dear Friends in the Asia Pacific
    Dear Friends in the Asia Pacific, Ushering in the hopeful year of 2008, we, the Korean Committee for Solidarity with the World People, all the societies for friendship with the Asia-Pacific people and the Korea-Asia Pacific Exchange, heartily extend our New Year greetings to you all.
    On the New Year Day, the 3 major newspapers in Korea, namely Rodong Sinmun, Josoninmingun and Chongnyonjonwi, published an annual joint editorial headlined "Glorify this year as a year of a new revolutionary upsurge, sounding the general advance", presenting the orientation of the new year activities in the DPR Korea. Attached below is its gist.

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2008
  • Korea Report December
  • 2008 Korean Film Festival in NZ
    Auckland 12-14 December; Wellington 13-15 December
  • Congratulations to PM of New Zealand
    Pyongyang, November 23 (KCNA) -- Kim Yong Il, premier of the DPRK Cabinet, on Nov. 21 sent a congratulatory message to John Philip Key upon his assumption of office as Prime Minister of New Zealand. Expressing the belief that the relations between the two countries developing on good terms recently would grow stronger thanks to their joint efforts, the message wished him success in his responsible work.
  • Congratulations to New Zealand FM
    Pyongyang, November 23 (KCNA) -- Pak Ui Chun, DPRK minister of Foreign Affairs, on Nov. 21 sent a congratulatory message to Murray Mecully on his appointment as New Zealand foreign minister. Expressing the belief that the relations between the two countries would further expand and develop in the interests of the peoples of the two countries in the future, the message wished the foreign minister success in the performance of his new job.
  • North Korea claim title in extra time
    4:00AM Monday Nov 17, 2008 By Terry Maddaford North Korea's amazing record in women's age-group soccer tournaments hit another high with their stunning extra time win in Fifa's Under-17 Women's World Cup at North Harbour Stadium yesterday. Down by a goal after just 1m 42s - and that credited as an own goal - the Koreans needed almost 75 minutes to claw their way back to 1-1 and take the game into a tense period of extra time. The winning goal, scored by substitute Jang Hyon Sun nine minutes after her introduction and eight minutes into the second period, sparked scenes of joy for the red-shirted players and their supporters. It was a body-blow for the Americans who had gone into the match as slight favourites.
  • Soccer: North Koreans overcome horror start to win under-17 World Cup
    6:25PM Sunday Nov 16, 2008 North Korea fought back from a nightmare start to secure a 2-1 extra-time win over the United States in the women's under-17 soccer World Cup final in Auckland today. A bizarre own goal from luckless Korean goalkeeper Hong Myong Hui opened the United States account after barely two minutes. Defender Cloee Colohan's mammoth throw-in cleared all the players in the box before bouncing over Hong, whose despairing fingers scraped the ball as it dropped into the net. Had she not touched the ball, the goal would have been disallowed as a goal cannot be scored directly from a throw-in. North Korea battled back and although play was scrappy for much of the first half they looked the stronger team through the midfield.
  • Editorial: Something special afoot in symbolic soccer finale
    4:00AM Saturday Nov 15, 2008 Something special in sport and international relations will take place at North Harbour Stadium tomorrow afternoon. A team of schoolgirls from North Korea, a country which is an immediate past member of George W. Bush's "axis of evil", will play his United States under-17 girls' side in the Fifa World Cup final. That a schoolgirl side from North Korea would be involved in the biggest sports event in New Zealand this weekend is peculiar in itself. We rarely see a visitor from the Hermit Kingdom. That these girls will find vocal support in the stands at Albany from local fans, resident here but formerly of South Korea, will speak volumes for sport's power to unify. It was on display in Christchurch during North Korea's victory over England midweek and a repeat must be on the cards from the Korean population on the North Shore and wider Auckland.
  • Soccer: Coy Koreans square up to US
    4:00AM Saturday Nov 15, 2008 By Craig Borley It's one of those sporting moments the script writers couldn't have penned any better - the United States and North Korean women's under-17 soccer teams meeting in the World Cup final at Albany tomorrow. The symbolic leaders of the free world, playing toe-to-toe against a communist nation America tagged as part of the "Axis of Evil". But for the North Koreans, it's just about football. Or so the Weekend Herald understands. An attempt to talk to the squad at their Takapuna training yesterday proved difficult. The US team has relatively short defenders, but tall strikers, three of the North Korean girls said through an interpreter. "But if we do our best we will have an opportunity to win in the final."
    But out on the training pitch their bashfulness melted away. If their discipline, soft touches and team unity are anything to go by, they will be a powerful force against the United States tomorrow. So too will their fans - a score of whom are South Korean. The two countries have a strained war-torn relationship, but at Thursday's Christchurch semifinal many of those cheering for the North Koreans were from South Korea.
  • Korea Report November
  • New Zealand: foreign policy and the election
    Author: Professor Gary Hawke, New Zealand Institute of Economic Research and Victoria University of Wellington As in most countries, including the United States, foreign policy is not a major issue in the current New Zealand election campaign. A contest among various forms of populism has little scope for looking overseas even if the more important longer-term influences on the prosperity of the various coalitions of voters being wooed are to be found abroad rather than locally.
  • Australia works to cover Japan's fuel to NKorea
    Updated October 24, 2008 13:10:28 The US and other six party members, sans Japan, are in discussions on how to pay for a million tonnes of oil for North Korea. [Reuters] The US and other six party members, sans Japan, are in discussions on how to pay for a million tonnes of oil for North Korea. [Reuters] Australia is working with the United States and Japan on how to pay for a bulk fuel purchase for North Korea, one of the inducements to Pyongyang in a nuclear disarmament deal. Australian foreign affairs officials appearing before a parliamentary committee in Canberra have confirmed Australia's involvement in discussions on how to pay for a million tonnes of oil for North Korea. Our Canberra correspondent, Linda Mottram, reports that Australia is among several countries considering how to fund the purchase. There is a funding shortfall, with Japan refusing to pay for its component of the purchase.
    The Australian government has been asked to help buy 200,000 tonnes of oil for North Korea to help move the six party nuclear disarmament agreement forward.
    New Zealand, where the government is in caretaker mode ahead of an election, is also involved in the talks.
  • Korea, New Zealand Will Cooperate in Film Industry
    New Zealand Ambassador to Korea Jane Coombs, left, poses with Park Young-in, chairman of the Korea-New Zealand Association, after receiving a plaque of appreciation during a party to celebrate the associationís 40th anniversary at the Diplomatic Center in southern Seoul, Friday. / Korea Times Photo by Kim Se-jeong By Kim Se-jeong Staff Reporter Five Korean films ? "Bungee Jumping of Their Own," "Old Boy," "Silmido," "Antarctic Journal" and "It's Okay As I Love You?" ? have one thing in common: They have made contributions to the Korea-New Zealand relationship. Besides the films, many Korean soap operas and commercials have also been filmed in New Zealand whose exotic, preserved nature has appealed to many international filmmakers.
  • Korea Report October 2008
  • Kim Yong Nam Meets New Zealand Ambassador
    Pyongyang, October 17 (KCNA) -- Kim Yong Nam, president of the Presidium of the Supreme People's Assembly of the DPRK, met and had a talk with New Zealand Ambassador to the DPRK Jane Coombs who paid a farewell call on him at the Mansudae Assembly Hall Friday
  • New peace professorship at Otago
    Professor Kevin Clements, an internationally respected New Zealand academic presently based at the University of Queensland, has been appointed to a new professorship in peace and conflict studies at the University of Otago, according to a report in the Otago Daily Times.
  • Melamine Found in New Zealand Milk Protein Lactoferrin
    † By Kim Rahn, Bae Ji-sook Staff Reporters The chemical melamine was found in the milk protein lactoferrin produced in New Zealand, the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) said Wednesday. This is the first time such a substance was found in imported foods from countries other than China. [Quality]
  • Korea Report September 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report August 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • NZ emergency aid to DPR Korea welcomed
    Statement by NZ-DPRK Society chairman Don Borrie
  • New Zealand to provide more food aid for DPRK
    21:28, July 29, 2008 New Zealand said Tuesday it will contribute an additional 500,000 NZ dollars (370,000 U.S. dollars) toward United Nations efforts to address food shortages in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK). Foreign Minister Winston Peters said in a statement "North Korea (DPRK) is facing the most severe food shortages since the famine years of the 1990s. There are fears that large numbers of families are being pushed further into hunger and famine and it is important New Zealand does what it can to assist." "The contribution announced today is a practical way New Zealand can ensure that the most vulnerable people in the global community have access to food," said Peters. This contribution followed the 500,000 NZ dollars New Zealand provided via the International Federation of the Red Cross immediately following last year's floods.
  • More food aid for North Korea
    Winston Peters
    29 July, 2008
    New Zealand will contribute an additional $500,000 towards United Nations efforts to address food shortages in North Korea, Foreign Minister Winston Peters announced today.
    ďNorth Korea is facing the most severe food shortages since the famine years of the 1990s. There are fears that large numbers of families are being pushed further into hunger and famine and it is important New Zealand does what it can to assist," said Mr Peters.
    ďFood prices have tripled in the past year due to the destruction of a significant proportion of the countryís crops in the August 2007 floods and high global food prices.
    ďThe World Food Programme is the only major international agency addressing the consequences of the food shortage in North Korea. They are a trusted partner for New Zealandís aid efforts and will help to ensure our assistance gets to those who need it most.
    ďThe contribution announced today is a practical way New Zealand can ensure that the most vulnerable people in the global community have access to food,Ē said Mr Peters.
    This contribution follows the $500,000 New Zealand provided via the International Federation of the Red Cross immediately following last year's floods.
  • PM Clark on aid to DPRK
    Prime Minister Helen Clark replies to Rev Don Borrie
  • Korea Report July 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report June 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
    Includes PMís visit
  • New Zealand PM tries out some energy savers
    May 19, 2008 New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark, seated, tests Hyundai Motor°Įs fuel-cell Tucson sport utility vehicle at the Korean automaker°Įs Namyang Technology Research Center in Hwaseong, Gyeonggi on Saturday. Hyundai-Kia Automotive Group Chairman Chung Mong-koo, far right, explained to Clark about the environmentally friendly technologies that Korea°Įs biggest automaker is developing. Clark also tested the hybrid Verna and Pride sedans in the laboratory. She hopes New Zealand can cooperate with the Korean automaker in developing alternative energy amid higher crude oil prices.
  • New Zealand FTA may be forthcoming
    May 17, 2008 Prime Minister Helen Clark of New Zealand, left, talks with South Korean President Lee Myung-bak yesterday at the Blue House. By Kim Kyung-bin President Lee Myung-bak and Prime Minister Helen Clark of New Zealand agreed yesterday to start talks on how a bilateral free trade agreement would work, according to the Blue House. The two leaders came to the agreement during a summit meeting at the Blue House. Clark arrived in Seoul on Thursday for her three-day official visit. °įThere is definitely a need to go over the feasibility of drawing up an FTA between the two countries,°Ī Lee said. °įRice is the only agricultural product that Korea can self-supply, and we depend entirely on imports for other grains.°Ī Lee made this remark in response to Prime Minister Clark°Įs statement that New Zealand could be a good partner to Korea because Korea is a major importer of agricultural products and needs a quality exporter. [FTA] li
  • Korea, New Zealand to Start FTA Talks
    President Lee Myung-bak, right, shakes hands with New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark before a summit at Cheong Wa Dae, Friday. Clark arrived in Seoul Thursday for a three-day official visit. / AP-Yonhap By Jung Sung-ki Staff Reporter President Lee Myung-bak and New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark agreed to begin negotiations on a free trade agreement (FTA) between the two countries, Cheong Wa Dae announced. In a summit Friday, the two leaders also agreed to promote cooperation on various sectors in bids to develop a partnership for the 21st century, the presidential office said. Prime Minister Clark arrived in Korea Thursday for a three-day official visit. [FTA]
  • Appeal to PM for emergency aid
    NZ-DPRK Society Chairman Rev Don Borrie writes to Prime Minister Helen Clark
    Dear Ms. Clark,
    On behalf of our Society , and our partners in the DPRK, I draw your attention to the famine that is developing in North Korea.
    We ask that the New Zealand Government make a generous and significant Emergency Grant for famine relief. ..//..
  • Korea Report May 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • New Zealand PM tours East Asia
    May 13, 2008 WELLINGTON ó New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark left for Japan and Korea yesterday to build on the country°Įs trade momentum with the region following the signing of a free trade agreement with China. Government officials told AFP there was little prospect of imminent progress on a free trade agreement with Japan, but the signs were more favorable with Korea. New Zealand became the first developed country to sign a free trade agreement with China last month.
  • Our Future with Asia
    Foreword by Rt Hon Helen Clark, Prime Minister
    Our Future with Asia sets out a framework for New Zealand to enhance its relationships in the Asian region. New Zealand has long recognised Asiaís importance to our security and prosperity. As a nation we have worked at many levels over the past half century to strengthen our ties with the region. The countries of Asia today are undergoing rapid and fundamental changes. We have much to learn from these changes. If we can keep pace, many new opportunities will open to us.
  • ĎRebelliousí Korean Girls in N.Zealand Attack
    New Zealandís sizeable Korean community is in shock at news that several Korean teenage girls held another girl captive and tortured her, apparently from rivalry over a boy. The weekly Sunday Star-Times reported Sunday that a youth court in Auckland found six Korean girls aged between 15 and 17 guilty of detaining a 16-year-old girl, also Korean, for more than an hour and burning her with cigarettes outside a supermarket in Auckland in February. According to the newspaper, some of the girls are currently living with one parent and some are living with home-stay families. All girls including the victim had trouble adjusting to their new environment, a spokesman for the Korean community told the paper. "The girls will attend a family group conference to redress the harm done to their victim. They will reappear for sentencing in the youth court in June," the weekly added.
  • Korea Report April 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report March 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • New Zealand, Korea consider FTA talks
    February 23, 2008 New Zealand and Korea may enter talks on a free-trade agreement after a report commissioned by the two governments showed both would benefit. The report shows a free-trade agreement would bring substantial economic benefits to both countries, New Zealand Trade Minister Phil Goff said in a statement e-mailed to Bloomberg News. He didn't release further details. "This study is a strong foundation from which our two countries can discuss the possibility of a free-trade agreement," Goff said. "We enjoy a highly complementary trading relationship and a free-trade agreement would be mutually beneficial."
  • Korea Report February 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report January 2008
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington

Return to top of page
2007 and before

  • NZ dangles promise of engagement for N. Korea
    By Lindsay Beck Reuters Saturday, November 17, 2007; 1:01 AM BEIJING (Reuters) - New Zealand's Foreign Minister held out the promise of deeper international engagement for North Korea if it follows through with nuclear disarmament steps, saying on Saturday that aid and investment could follow. North Korea has been isolated over its atomic ambitions, but, under a multilateral agreement, its steps to dismantle its nuclear weapons programs are to be matched with diplomatic normalization and moves in the United States to remove the country from its terrorism blacklist.
    "I left the clear impression with the North Koreans that there is an enormous community out there that I believe would back their cooperation on this issue with significant investment and aid into the Korean people," New Zealand Foreign Minister Winston Peters told reporters in Beijing. "I don't think we can underscore how important that is for a country that's fallen behind economically and socially." Peters made the comments following a trip to the North -- the first for a New Zealand minister since the two countries established formal ties in 2001 -- where he met number two leader Kim Yong-nam, and the foreign, trade and agriculture ministers. He said they discussed opportunities for cooperation in training and agriculture for the North, which is so poor it cannot feed its people or afford electricity to run its factories, but that no agreements were finalized.
  • Peters completes visit to North Korea
    18 November 2007
    New Zealand is willing to assist North Koreaís economic development if it follows through on its commitments under the Six Party Talks, Foreign Minister Winston Peters said after a two-day visit to North Korea. While in North Korea, Mr Peters had talks with President Kim Yong-Nam; Foreign Minister Pak Ui-Chun; the Ministers of Trade and Agriculture, and the head of the committee for relations with foreign countries. He also visited a garment factory and a farm on the outskirts of the capital, Pyongyang. ďOur message was straightforward. We are encouraged by progress to date in the Six Party Talks on the denuclearisation of North Korea, and if North Korea continues to cooperate and implement its undertakings, New Zealand is ready to develop the relationship,Ē Mr Peters said. ďNorth Korean officials were keen to expand the relationship, and we talked about possible areas of cooperation, particularly in agriculture, training, and conservation. Nothing is finalised, but there is scope for officials to follow up. ďThe progress and outlook for the Six Party Talks formed an important part of our discussions. North Korean officials reaffirmed their commitment to implementing the current agreements, and they told us they are ready to take further steps on an action-for-action basis. ďHowever, while they said they would do what they have promised, they also made it clear that this was contingent on all other Six Party Talks members fulfilling their obligations according to the agreed schedule. ďWe also discussed human rights, not in terms of specific, but as an area of considerable concern for the international community, and one where we expected progress to be made.Ē Mr Peters said while he had visited many parts of Pyongyang, it was important to be realistic about impressions formed from a short trip that did not involve travelling deep into rural areas. ďHowever what we did see was a country that has fallen behind many of its Asian neighbours in social and economic terms. My message was that North Korea will benefit substantially from international support if they follow through on their promises to denuclearise,Ē Mr Peters said.
  • Peters "encouraged" by North Korea trip
    Newsroom.co.nz agency story † Foreign Affairs Minister, Winston Peters, says New Zealand is ready to develop a relationship with North Korea if it follows through on its commitments under the Six Party Talks. Mr Peters was invited by North Korea to visit and has just completed a two day visit to the isolated communist nation. While in North Korea, Mr Peters had talks with President Kim Yong-Nam; Foreign Minister Pak Ui-Chun; the Ministers of Trade and Agriculture, and the head of the committee for relations with foreign countries. He also visited a garment factory and a farm on the outskirts of the capital, Pyongyang. Mr Peters said he was encouraged by progress to date in the Six Party Talks on the denuclearisation of North Korea.† He said if North Korea continues to cooperate and implement its undertakings, New Zealand is ready to develop a relationship. "North Korean officials were keen to expand the relationship, and we talked about possible areas of cooperation, particularly in agriculture, training, and conservation. Nothing is finalised, but there is scope for officials to follow up. "The progress and outlook for the Six Party Talks formed an important part of our discussions. North Korean officials reaffirmed their commitment to implementing the current agreements, and they told us they are ready to take further steps on an action-for-action basis," he said. Mr Peters said North Korea also made it clear its cooperation was contingent on all other Six Party Talks members fulfilling their obligations according to the agreed schedule.† Members are the two Koreas, the United States, Japan, Russia and China. "We also discussed human rights, not in terms of specific, but as an area of considerable concern for the international community, and one where we expected progress to be made," he said. Mr Peters next stop is the United States where he is expected to meet with US Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice.
  • Peters proposes closeness if North Korea follows disarmament plan
    5:00AM Sunday November 18, 2007 Winston Peters New Zealand's Foreign Minister, Winston Peters, held out the promise of deeper international engagement for North Korea if it follows through with nuclear disarmament steps. Peters, the highest-ranking Western visitor to the North since it conducted a nuclear test in October last year, said that aid and investment could follow. North Korea has been isolated over its atomic ambitions but, under a multilateral agreement, its steps to dismantle its nuclear weapons programmes are to be matched with diplomatic normalisation and moves in the United States to remove the country from its terrorism blacklist. "I left the clear impression with the North Koreans that there is an enormous community out there that I believe would back their co-operation on this issue with significant investment and aid into the Korean people," Peters told reporters in Beijing. "I don't think we can underscore how important that is for a country that's fallen behind." Peters made the comments after a trip to the North - the first for a New Zealand minister since the two countries established formal ties in 2001 - where he met number two leader Kim Yong-nam, and the foreign, trade and agriculture ministers. They discussed opportunities for co-operation in training and agriculture for the North, which is so poor it cannot feed its people or afford electricity to run its factories. "Their officials reaffirmed their full commitment in implementing current agreements. They look forward to even further steps on an action-for-action basis," Peters said. "While they said they will do what they promised, they also made it clear that this was contingent on all other six-party participants fulfilling their obligations on the agreed schedule." He also extended an invitation for North Korean officials to visit New Zealand. North Korea reaffirmed its commitment to a disarmament agreement reached at six-party talks that group the two Koreas, the United States, Japan, Russia and host China. - REUTERS
  • Kim Yong Nam Meets FM of New Zealand
    Pyongyang, November 16 (KCNA) -- Kim Yong Nam, president of the Presidium of the DPRK Supreme People's Assembly, met and conversed with Foreign Minister of New Zealand Winston Raymond Peters and his party at the Mansudae Assembly Hall Friday when the latter paid a courtesy call on him. Present there were Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs Kim Yong Il and officials concerned.
  • Foreign Minister of New Zealand Gives Reception
    Pyongyang, November 17 (KCNA) -- Foreign Minister of New Zealand Winston Raymond Peters gave a reception on Friday as regards his visit to the DPRK. Present there on invitation were DPRK Foreign Minister Pak Ui Chun, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs Kim Yong Il and officials concerned. On hand were the foreign minister of New Zealand and his party.
  • FM of New Zealand and His Party Leave
    Pyongyang, November 18 (KCNA) -- Foreign Minister of New Zealand Winston Raymond Peters and his party left here Saturday after winding up their visit to the DPRK. During their stay here they visited Mangyongdae, the native home of President Kim Il Sung, the Tower of the Juche Idea and Pyongyang Metro and enjoyed a performance given by members of art group of the Mangyongdae Schoolchildren's Palace.
  • Korean mountain high for two Kiwi hikers
    November 17, 2007 Roger Shepherd poses on Mount Seokbyeong, part of the Baekdudaegan range, in Gangwon, during the a hiking project he and his fellow New Zealander Andrew Douch launched in September and finished last Saturday. They walked the length of the range in South Korea. Photo by Andrew Douch The Baekdudaegan mountains run almost the entire length of the Korean Peninsula, a ruggedly majestic series of landmarks that define the geography of the country. The white-tipped ridges that give the range its name are among Koreaís highest peaks and the source of its major rivers. One would think that Baekdudaegan, with its beautiful, well-developed hiking trails on the southern side of the border, would be a world-class attraction, but it is little known to the outside world despite its local reputation. The 670-kilometer-long (417-mile-long) Baekdudaegan is relatively unexplored by non-Korean hikers and climbers and there is precious little information about it written in English. But thanks to two New Zealanders, Baekdudaegan could finally begin attracting its share of international mountain-lovers. Roger Shepherd, 41, and Andrew Douch, 30, finished hiking the entire range within South Koreaís borders last Saturday, a project they started in a bid to let the mountains be known globally.
    A plan to hike Mount Kumgang, currently the only access point to North Korea on the range, was dropped in the middle of the expedition for unspecified reasons. But, Shepherd said hiking into the North along the Baekdudaegan is an open possibility for the two Kiwi hikers. It canít be done at the moment, he said, ďbut one day when it [Baekdudaegan] is open in North Korea. it will be possible.Ē
  • Talks Held between FM of DPRK and FM of New Zealand
    Pyongyang, November 15 (KCNA) -- Talks between Foreign Minister of the DPRK Pak Ui Chun and Foreign Minister of New Zealand Winston Raymond Peters were held at the Mansudae Assembly Hall Thursday. Present there from the DPRK side were officials concerned and from the New Zealand side the party of its foreign minister. At the talks both sides exchanged views on the issue of boosting the bilateral relations and matters of mutual concern.
  • FM of New Zealand Feted
    Pyongyang, November 15 (KCNA) -- The government of the DPRK gave a reception for Foreign Minister of New Zealand Winston Raymond Peters and his party on a visit to the DPRK at the Mansudae Assembly Hall Wednesday. Present there on invitation were the foreign minister of New Zealand and his party. Foreign Minister Pak Ui Chun, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs Kim Yong Il and officials concerned were on hand. Pak Ui Chun said in his speech at the reception that it would be in the interests of the two countries to boost the bilateral ties of friendship and cooperation on the principle of respect for sovereignty, non-interference in each other's internal affairs, mutual benefit and equality. Winston Raymond Peters said in his speech that it was not long since the two countries established diplomatic ties, but there are a lot of things to learn from each other, hoping that the good relations between New Zealand and the DPRK would go on.
  • Our Future with Asia
    White Paper from the NZ Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade
    Our Future with Asia sets out a framework for New Zealand to enhance its relationships in the Asian region. New Zealand has long recognised Asiaís importance to our security and prosperity. As a nation we have worked at many levels over the past half century to strengthen our ties with the region. The countries of Asia today are undergoing rapid and fundamental changes. We have much to learn from these changes. If we can keep pace, many new opportunities will open to us.
  • Pak Ui Chun Meets Foreign Minister of New Zealand
    Pyongyang, November 14 (KCNA) -- DPRK Foreign Minister Pak Ui Chun met and had a friendly conversation with Foreign Minister of New Zealand Winston Raymond Peters and his party at the Mansudae Assembly Hall Wednesday when they paid a courtesy call on him. On hand were Kim Yong Il, vice-minister of Foreign Affairs, and officials concerned.
  • New Zealand FM Arrives Here
    Pyongyang, November 14 (KCNA) -- Winston Raymond Peters, foreign minister of New Zealand, and his party arrived here Wednesday.
  • Peters' bid to sway North Korea
    Nov 11, 2007 6:41 PM
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters is about to leave on an historic anti-nuclear mission to the reclusive state of North Korea. It is the first time there has been such a high-level visit between the two countries. And ONE News is the only television network travelling with the minister. North Korea has just taken its first concrete step towards disabling its largest nuclear reactor. US nuclear experts have been helping with that process as part of a grand plan negotiated by six of the world's biggest players. New Zealand has helped on the edges, but is now stepping up its role as peace broker.
  • Korea Report November 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report October 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report September 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • New Zealand Picked as Model for National Branding
    By Jane Han Staff Reporter A clean and green oasis, 100 percent pure, and the land of ``Lord of the Rings'' are some of New Zealand's signature images that have been shaped over the years, transforming the southwestern Pacific dairy country into the world's fourth most desired place to visit in 2006. How did this happen? Competitive national branding, says the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA), adding that an equivalent tourism and trade boost would happen here if Korea benchmarked some of New Zealand's winning points. [Country image]
  • NZ aid for DPRK flood victims welcomed
    NZ-DPRK Society Media release 29 August 2007
    The NZ Government is to be congratulated for its decision to make through the Red Cross an emergency grant of $500,000 for victims of the recent devastating floods in North Korea.
    This grant together with $20,000 from Christian World Service and $5,000 from the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand Global Ministries Fund will be gratefully received by North Koreans who have lost relatives, lost homes, lost their summer harvest, lost transport infrastructure.
    We are reliably informed by the DPRK NZ Friendship Society that the 12 August floods destroyed 30,000 homes for over 63,000 families. Tens of thousands of hectares of farmland inundated, buried under silt or washed away. 800 public buildings were destroyed as were over 540 bridges, 70 sections of railroad, and 1,100 vehicles, pumps and electric motors.
    The NZ Friendship Haksan Farm had 100% of vegetable fields completely washed away and 150 hectares of rice planted fields buried in water.
    Our New Zealand grants will barely touch the surface of need but the Korean people will know that New Zealanders care.
    Don Borrie, Chairman

    NZ church groups respond to disaster
    Christian World Service: $20,000
    Global Mission Office of the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand.: $5000

  • NZ flood aid for North Korea
    21 August 2007
    New Zealand is to give $500,000 to the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC) to help people affected by serious flooding in North Korea, Foreign Minister Winston Peters said today.
    ďTorrential rain and flooding has caused widespread devastation across North Korea, with Kangwon province the most seriously affected. Preliminary reports indicate hundreds of casualties and over 63,000 families left homeless," Mr Peters said.
    "When a disaster like this occurs, itís important that New Zealand does what it can to assist.
    "Our funding, which will be provided through the governmentís aid agency NZAID, will help the IFRC provide emergency food and shelter.
    ďThe IFRC is already active in North Korea, so it is well placed to carry out evacuation and relief activities, and to assist with the rebuilding of homes and livelihoods as soon as practicable," Mr Peters said.
  • Appeal for flood assistance
    16 August 2007
    Don Borrie urges Prime Minister Helen Clark to give urgent and generous help
  • Don Borrie castigates DominionPost editorial
    This letter was published 9 August 2007
    The DominionPost editorial of 4 August does not seem to be available but readers can check out a similar one in the Christchurch Press on 3 August
  • Korea Report August 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • NZ-DPRK Society welcomes Peters proposed visit to DPRK
    Media release
    The NZ-DPRK Society is glad that Rt Hon Winston Peters has accepted the invitation of Pak Ui Chun, the Foreign Minister of DPR Korea, to visit that country. The Society has been involved in the building of bridges between New Zealand and DPR Korea for many years and is convinced that official exchanges and linkages, if properly conceived, can be beneficial to the people of both countries as well as promoting peace in our region.
    If they are to realise their potential, official visits must be based on mutual respect and an awareness of the situation and aspirations of the other side. New Zealand is fortunate in having no substantial external enemies, and being far from world trouble spots. We have not been subject to sanctions and intimidation, and have not had our independence threatened. It behoves us to engage countries who do face such challenges in a spirit of humility and fellowship.
    The present situation arising from the Six Party Talks is promising and if all parties honour their commitments to the Agreement of 13th February, with an honest desire for peace and a commitment to relegate the hostility of the past to history, then we can look forward to a more harmonious future. This is not just a matter for the government of DPR Korea alone. We hope that Mr Peters assures his hosts in Pyongyang that New Zealand, as an independent country, supports the independence of others, and regards the parties to the Agreement as all equally bound by it.
    In recent years the NZ-DPRK Society has been able to arrange a NZ teacher for the NZ Friendship School in Pyongyang, and has donated a tractor and a small truck to the NZ Friendship Farm outside the capital. These are concrete examples of the developing relationship between our peoples and we hope that Mr Peters will have the opportunity to visit both places as a symbol of government endorsement of these private initiatives.
    There are many ways in which New Zealand can assist the people of DPR Korea with aid in terms of materials and training. We hope that Mr Peters will explore these possibilities with generosity. We would like to see the relationship moving quickly beyond aid into trade and investment. Again there are many possibilities. Mr Peters could well look at the government of South Korea with its commitment to aid, trade, and investment as an example to emulate.
    Most of all we hope that Mr Peters, in visiting DPR Korea, can help foster a climate in which aid and tensions become things of the past, and peaceful trade, investment, and people-to-people exchange becomes the norm. This is the aspiration of the people, and governments, of both Koreas and we think that the Foreign Minister can play a modest but valuable role in advancing that common goal.
  • Greens back Petersí visit to North Korea
    Thu, 02 Aug 2007 05:25a.m. The Greens are supporting the Foreign Minister's decision to visit North Korea. † Winston Peters plans to travel there this year after accepting an invitation from his North Korean counterpart. † North Korea's being cautiously welcomed back to the international community after agreeing to shut down its nuclear reactor and allow international monitors back. † The Greens are critical of the isolationist regime, but foreign affairs spokesman Keith Locke says Mr Peters is right to visit, if only to keep up the pressure on the nuclear issue.
  • Peters accepts invitation to visit North Korea
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters accepted an invitation to visit North Korea when he met his North Korean counterpart Pak Vi Chun in Manila yesterday evening.
    "The meeting offered a chance to explain New Zealand's longstanding wish to see peace and security on the Korean peninsula, and its strong support for the Six Party Talks process," said Mr Peters, who is in Manila for the ASEAN Regional Forum and associated meetings. "I was happy to accept Minister Pak's invitation, as I want to see for myself how New Zealand might contribute to international efforts to assist development in North Korea. "We are pleased that North Korea has honoured its agreement to shutdown its Yongbyon nuclear reactor and allowed inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency to return. "While much remains to be done, New Zealand is encouraged by the current mood of both North Korea and the international community to move rapidly towards implementing agreements reached during February's Six Party Talks. "We hope North Korea will continue to work closely with its Six Party Talks colleagues, because our long-held view is that peace and security on the Korean peninsula is fundamental to the political and economic stability of the wider Asian region. "I told Minister Pak that New Zealand is willing to develop an assistance programme for North Korea in support of the Six Party Talks and the peace process. "However before that could happen we would want assurances that North Korea will continue to take tangible steps towards engaging with the international community, and towards the denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula," Mr Peters said.
  • Korea Report July 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Teaching, and learning, in Pyongyang
    Tim Kearns is a primary school teacher from Christchurch who recently spent three months teaching in Pyongyang. It was an interesting and worthwhile experience, as he recounts, with many surprises.
  • Vehicles Donated to Korean Farm
    Pyongyang, July 5 (KCNA) -- The New Zealand-DPRK Society donated vehicles to the DPRK-New Zealand Friendship Haksan Co-op Farm, Hyongjesan District, Pyongyang. A presentation ceremony was held at the farm on Thursday. Present at the ceremony were Pak Kyong Il, chairman of the DPRK-New Zealand Friendship Society, and other members of the society and officials of the farm and Peter Wilson, member of the New Zealand-DPRK Society, who is on a visit to the DPRK.
    Prior to the ceremony, the participants looked round cozy houses, a kindergarten and a nursery there and Haksan-ri People's Hospital and enjoyed an art performance.
  • NZ Film festival - CROSSING THE LINE
    Director: Daniel Gordon Year: 2006 Running time: 90 mins UK Producers: Daniel Gordon, Nicholas Bonner Photography: Nick Bennet Editor: Peter Haddon Music: Craig Armstrong Narrator: Christian Slater In English and Korean, with English subtitles M low level offensive language Festivals: Pusan 2006; Sundance, Berlin 2007
    In 1962, Private James Dresnok, a 19-year-old American border guard in the notorious Korean demilitarized zone, deserted the US army and crossed over into communist North Korea. One of only four American soldiers to defect there during the height of the Cold War, Dresnok was initially arrested as a spy, before the North Korean government found they could use his unusual circumstances in their propaganda campaign against the United States. Dresnok became a film star, playing the evil American again and again. He also got married, had three children and lives in North Korea to this day. Director Daniel Gordon (making his third film about North Korea with producer Ė and Festival guest Ė Nicholas Bonner) skilfully counterpoints Dresnokís own testimony against fascinating interviews with former friends and colleagues from his American life, as well as stark archival footage of the Peopleís Republic and interviews with the Korean soldiers who initially arrested him. Branded ĎComrade Joeí by Stateside media of the time, Dresnok tells his story here for the first time
    Auckland
    22 Jul | 5:45pm SKYCITY Theatre
    23 Jul | 10:45am SKYCITY Theatre

    Wellington
    23 Jul | 6:15pm | Paramount
    24 Jul | 1:30pm | Paramount

  • Crossing the Line
    In 1962, a U.S. soldier sent to guard the peace in South Korea deserted his unit, walked across the most heavily fortified area on earth and defected to the Cold War enemy, the communist state of North Korea. He then simply disappeared from the face of the known world. He became a coveted star of the North Korean propaganda machine, and found fame acting in films, typecast as an evil American. He uses Korean as his daily language. He has three sons from two wives. He has now lived in North Korea twice as long as he has in America. At one time, there were four Americans living in North Korea. Today, just one remains. Now, after 45 years, the story of Comrade Joe, the last American defector in North Korea, is told.
    Based on our work on the two North Korean films over the last five years, VeryMuchSo Productions, in partnership with Koryo Tours, has gained the trust of the North Korean authorities. This has enabled clear and unrestricted access to James Joseph Dresnok and to the North Korean-based families of the other U.S. defectors.
  • Korea Report June 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report May 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report April 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Call for NZ-DPRK Peace Treaty
    Letter to PM Clark from Moderator of Moderator, Presbytery of Wellington
    Dear Prime Minister
    Greetings from the Wellington Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand.
    Thank you for your letter of 4 December 2006 regarding the situation in North Korea.
    At the 2007 April meeting the Presbytery considered your response and agreed that dialogue was important.
    The following motion was unanimously passed:
    "That Wellington Presbytery supports a call to the Government of New Zealand to enter into a Peace Agreement with the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea and that copies of this letter be sent to our sister churches."
    The Revd Don Borrie spoke to the motion with the address appended to this letter.
    The Presbytery was alerted to the fact that New Zealand is still officially at war with North Korea (having never moved beyond the Armistice). Presbytery urges the Government to†attend to this unfortunate situation for the sake of the process of peace -building.
    Such over-sights can be speedily rectified when explanation is made to Members of Parliament.
    We trust attention will be given to this as soon as expedient.
    Yours sincerely
    Margaret Inch
    Moderator,
    Presbytery of Wellington
    cc. Anglican, Baptist, Methodist, Roman Catholic, Salvation Army Churches
  • New Zealand - DPRK Korea Peace Treaty
    The proposal is that this Presbytery call on the Government to enter into a formal Peace Agreement with the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea and that this approach be communicated to our sister churches.
  • Korea, New Zealand Conducting Joint Maritime Drills
    South Korea and New Zealand are conducting a joint military exercise in the East Sea in a move to enhance anti-submarine operations capabilities, the Korean Navy said Monday. The nine-day training kicked off on April 2, including operation of the New Zealand Air Force's P-3K maritime patrol aircraft with 24 soldiers. "The training session includes the cross-decking of maritime patrol planes of the two nations and anti-submarine simulation exercises," a Navy spokesman said. The exercise, the fourth of its kind, was set up under a 1996 agreement between vice defense ministers of the two countries. The previous ones were held in 1997, 1999, and 2005. New Zealand's Ambassador to Seoul Jane Coombs and Air Commodore Peter Stockwell, air component commander of New Zealand's Joint Force Headquarters, visited the Korean Navy's 6th Air Wing in Pohang, 374 km southeast of Seoul, on Monday to give pep talks to the soldiers, according to naval officials.
  • Borrie welcomes NZ commitment to Initial Actions Agreement
    Don Borrie writes that The Government is to be congratulated in its announcement through Prime Minister Helen Clark that it intends to make a grant to the DPRK (North Korea) to go towards the cost of energy within the context of the Initial Actions Agreement. [Agreement070213]
  • Non-proliferation efforts in North Korea
    Prime Minister Helen Clark said today that New Zealand would be willing to contribute to an energy assistance package for North Korea. ďThe energy assistance package we would contribute to is part of the Initial Actions Agreement (IAA) which was negotiated at the February session of the Six Party Talks. That agreement also includes specific commitments by North Korea to denucleariseĒ, Helen Clark said. [Agreement070213]
  • Bush meets New Zealand's PM
    U.S. President George W. Bush met on Wednesday with New Zealand's Prime Minister Helen Clark at the White House with the two sides having exchanged views over bilateral cooperation and international issues of mutual concern. "We talked about North Korea and Iran, our mutual desire for these problems of nations wanting to have nuclear weapons to be solved in a peaceful way, by using the diplomatic process," Bush told a news briefing after the talks. Bush also said that the United States will "help in any way we can" to address difficult situations in the Pacific. Clark, who praised U.S. involvement in Pacific affairs, said New Zealand is working closely with the United States in the fields of, among others, counter-terrorism and counter- proliferation. "The U.S. is focusing on the problems of the South Pacific," Clark said. "We've had close coordination." Source: Xinhua
  • Korea Report March 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Letter to PM Helen Clark regarding her meeting with President Bush
    Dear Helen, Having just returned from attending meetings in Pyongyang, and noting your media comments re your meeting with President Bush which will include consideration of the DPRK I wanted to share with you the following observationsÖ//..
    Don Borrie, Chairman, NZ-DPRK Society

Wolfgang Rosenberg
Wolfgang Rosenberg, the noted economist and, inter alia, co-founder of the NZ-DPRK Society, died on 16th February 2007.
Don Borrie, the other co-founder, and current president of the society, writes:
It is with a sense of gratitude and sadness that on my return from the DPRK I learnt of Woof's death.
A major influential thinker and teacher in the field of economics we, in the NZ DPRK Society are indebted to Woof for his inspiration and leadership when in the early 1970's, he saw the importance of establishing a DPRK-NZ relationship. Thanks to his enthusiasm I had the confidence to join with him in co-founding the NZ DPRK Society and shortly afterwards had the pleasure of travelling with him to be the first NZrs to make personal contact with the DPRK since the US - Korean War.
Growing out of his previous German experience, Woof began a study of the two Korean economic systems which, during the 1970s, he shared with colleagues both in the DPRK and NZ. Arising from these studies he was convinced of the uniqueness of the Korean situation and the wisdom of the DPRK approach to peaceful reunification.
A man of great compassion and humility Woof has been first and foremost a close and much loved friend to so many of us, including myself. What contribution I have been able to make to achieve international peace with justice, not least in Korea and New Zealand, has been inspired by the presence and personal affection so freely given by Woof.
As we share our support with Woof's wife Ann and family I conclude with the same ending Woof would conclude his letters of encouragement and gratitude.....simply, Love

    Other obituaries include:
    • Funeral oration by Bill Willmott
      The year before I met him, Wolf had taken a sabbatical trip to what we then called the socialist countries in Europe and Asia, places no tourists went in those days, 1972 China, North Korea, Hungary, Poland, Yugoslavia, Albania and the Soviet Union. I have a photo of him with Guo Moruo, the famous communist intellectual, who hosted a banquet for him in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. He came back convinced that we had lots to learn from the socialist countries, particularly from the resolutely self-reliant North Korea, so he founded the NZ-DPRK Society and asked me to be president. Like the other organisations he supported, he was the secretary and did all the work, but he gave someone else the kudos as leader.
    • Why it would help to cry Wolf
      The Dominion Post | Friday, 23 February 2007 By CHRIS TROTTER With the death last Friday of Wolfgang Rosenberg, the New Zealand Left lost its last great public intellectual of the Depression era.
    • Economist Wolfgang Rosenberg leaves huge legacy
      Jim Anderton
      Posted on 20 February 2007 Topic: Jim Anderton's Press Releases ďI mark with considerable regret and a great sense of loss, news of the passing of the Christchurch economic thinker and academic Wolfgang Rosenberg,Ē said M P for Wigram and Progressive leader Jim Anderton said today. ďĎWoofyí, as he was affectionately known to family and close friends was one of our unsung heroes. He was probably best known to generations of Canterbury University students as an inspirational and stimulating teacher of economics, not a subject that often inspires that sort of enthusiasm. In that role he was not afraid to go against the orthodox or the powerful and publicly crossed swords with Prime Minister Robert Muldoon on more than one occasion.
    • Wolfgang Rosenberg dies
      It is with great regret that I inform you that Wolfgang Rosenberg died today aged 92. He had been in poor health for the best part of a decade.
      A Berliner, Wolf arrived in NZ in 1937 as a refugee from Naziism (he had relatives and friends murdered in the Holocaust). Germanyís loss was New Zealandís gain.
      He was an academic at the University of Canterbury from 1945 until his retirement in 1980, finishing up as a Reader in Economics. Following his compulsory retirement from academia he started a new career as a Christchurch lawyer, and practised in the courts until ill health forced him to finally retire at 83.
      During his 70 years in New Zealand Wolf became a wellknown public figure as one of the countryís foremost Leftwing economists, with a string of books to his name, not to mention a ceaseless flow of articles and Letters To The Editor. He was actively involved in virtually every Christchurch Left/liberal organisation and publication that you could name over those decades, from the Canterbury Council for Civil Liberties to the former Monthly Review, to name but two. He was involved in all the big campaigns, such as those against the Vietnam War and NZís ties to apartheid South Africa, plus those of recent years.
      He was a staunch proponent of socialism and travelled extensively in what used to be known as the Second World (or as the papers called it, the Communist bloc). He was the founder and driving figure behind the NZ Democratic Peopleís Republic of Korea Society, and spent many years fostering friendly relations with that country.
      He was a member and supporter of CAFCA from our foundation, more than 30 years ago, and he regularly wrote for Foreign Control Watchdog until his deteriorating eyesight would no allow it.
      Wolfgang Rosenberg was a major public figure in the New Zealand of the second half of the 20th Century.
      He is survived by Ann, his wife of 60 years, and his children, George, Bill and Vera, and grandchildren.
      The funeral will be at 1.30pm on Tuesday 20 February at Lamb and Hayward's chapel at 467 Wairakei Road, Burnside, Christchurch. In lieu of flowers you can make a donation to the Howard League for Penal Reform, for which there will be a collection box.
      Messages can be sent to: 26 Beckenham Street, Christchurch 8024, bill.rosenberg@canterbury.ac.nz
      Murray Horton Secretary/Organiser
    • Socialist lawyer and economist
      Mike Crean
      Wolfgang Rosenberg sought paradise in New Zealand.
      As a socialist Jew escaping Hitler's Germany, he thought he had found it when he reached Wellington in 1937. His impression was confirmed when he picked up a good job in four days and from conversations on a hitchhiking tour of the country.
      But paradise was flawed and Rosenberg spent the next 70 years trying to change it

  • Korea Report January 2007
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • N.Korea, U.S. 'Reached Agreement' in Berlin Talks
    North Korea and the U.S. reached ďa certain level of agreementĒ during four days of talks that started Tuesday between the Northís top nuclear negotiator and his U.S. counterpart in Berlin, North Koreaís Foreign Ministry said Friday. The remark, carried by the Korea Central News Agency, was echoed by U.S. chief negotiator Christopher Hill.
  • President Roh Visits New Zealand
    Free Trade Agreement with South Korea no certainty
    Rich Bowden (sremmah) Email Article Print Article Published 2006-12-09 15:21 (KST)
    Exploratory talks on a mutual free trade agreement were held in Wellington, NZ yesterday between South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun and New Zealand's Prime Minister Helen Clark, with both leaders agreeing to a joint study to examine the feasibility of such an accord amid warnings that such a deal could be a long way off.
    President Roh, though endorsing the study, warned that the process of convincing the Korean people of the benefits of the free trade agreement would take time, particularly with respect to the Korean agricultural sector where farmers may see an influx of cheap New Zealand products such as meat, dairy and seafood into the South Korean market as damaging to their own livelihood. [IM] [FTA]
  • Korea Report December 2006
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Korea Report October-November 2006
    Newsletter from ROK embassy, Wellington
  • Letter to PM Helen Clark from Presbytery of Wellington
    26 October 2006

    Rt Hon. Helen Clark
    Prime Minister
    Parliament Buildings
    PO Box 18 888
    Wellington

    Dear Prime Minister

    At its recent meeting the Presbytery of Wellington resolved to write to you with the following motion which was unanimously agreed to.

    That an open†urgent letter is sent to the Prime Minister noting:
    1. Nuclear weapons are a threat to humanity.
    2. Peace is promoted by talking.
    3. In the case of North Korea continuing†economic and political sanctions will antagonise and increase distrust between nations.
    4. Urging New Zealand to support the positions taken by South Korea, China and Russia re negotiations with the DPRK.
    5. Asking the NZ Government to make an emergency grant for DPRK victims of the summer floods.

    A copy of this letter to be sent to the Korean Christian Federation, Pyongyang.

    We ask you to take appropriate action.

    We would be grateful for a reply to this letter.

    Yours sincerely

    Margaret Inch
    Moderator, Presbytery of Wellington
    cc Rev. Kang Yong-Sub, Chairperson of Central Committee of Korean Christian Federation

  • Ambassador's Maori greeting
    Ambassador's Maori greeting: South Korea's new Ambassador to New Zealand Lee Joon-gyu, right, rubs noses with Elly Pickering at Government House in Wellington, Wednesday. Lee shared the traditional Maori welcome, known as a Hongi, when he went to New Zealand's Government House to present his credentials. [photo]
  • NZ-DPRK Society media release on nuclear test
    Test firing of nuclear devices is regrettable whoever is responsible. In the case of the DPRK nuclear test it is important to remember that ever since the Bush Administration reneged on the Agreed Framework in 2002 the DPRK has been calling on the US to enter into bi lateral talks .
  • Borrie wites to Radio NZ
    Editor, Radio NZ
    The United States is presently cynically using popular abhorrence of nuclear weapons to lock New Zealand into its campaign to defeat North Korea.
    The Bush Government , with its arsenal of nuclear weapons at the ready, has been engaged in a long campaign designed to collapse the North Korean economy through trade and investment embargoes, access to international finance .
    The Americans have consistently attempted to foment Korean civil unrest by blocking North Koreaís access to the World Bank and International Monetary Fund civil development finance, and interrupting the flow of emergency and development aid thereby keeping the population malnourished.
  • Media Release on military exercises
    24-8-06
    In an act of provocation a massive US led military action named ďUlji-Focus LensĒ is presently taking place in South Korea.
    Between 21 August and 1 September over 8,000 troops using ultra modern armaments and supported by a nuclear aircraft carrier are staging continuous military exercises as preparation for war against North Korea. b This offensive military exercise has created a dangerous level of anxiety within North Korea and can only strengthen the North Korean resolve to rely on military strength to defend itself.
    ďI see this as a grave set back to the increasing conviction of Koreans that their peaceful future should be determined by and for Koreans free of the interference of outside powers, including the US.Ē said NZ DPRK Society Chairman, Rev Don Borrie.
    Despite its declared commitment to resolving international conflict through the United Nations the NZ Government is remaining silent as the US engages in yet another unilateral military action. ďThis compounds the NZ silence following the devastating loss of life and infrastructure through floods suffered by North Korea in the last three weeksĒ, said Mr Borrie.
  • Korea trade pact with New Zealand won't be threat
    † October 05, 2006 ? New Zealand is ready to begin a free trade agreement with Korea to export more of its lamb and dairy products, and the trade pact is not likely to threaten the livelihood of Korean farmers, said Michael Cullen, deputy prime minister and the minister of finance of New Zealand. "There are very few areas where New Zealand producers are threats to Korean farmers because we produce different things," Mr. Cullen said in an interview with the JoongAng Daily this week. Mr. Cullen visited Korea Oct. 1-3 to meet Korean president Roh Moo-hyun and other government officials to discuss education exchange and trade issues. Mr. Cullen said the New Zealand government is anxious to begin trade negotiation with Korea, which is New Zealand's seventh-largest trading partner. Mr. Cullen also tried to quiet possible opposition from Korean farmers, stressing that New Zealand exports have "never" pushed local producers in foreign markets out of business.
  • Peters condemns Nth Korea nuclear test threat
    Rt Hon Winston Peters 4/10/2006
    North Korea's statement that it is planning to test a nuclear weapon is inflammatory and completely incompatible with efforts to build security in the Asia-Pacific region, Foreign Minister Winston Peters said today. North Korea last night announced plans for a nuclear weapon test, although it gave no time frame. Pyongyang has previously said it has nuclear weapons, but is not known to have conducted any test to prove its claim. ďNorth Koreaís statement is intolerable, and New Zealand joins others in the international community in condemning it,Ē Mr Peters said. ďIf this threat is carried out, North Korea can expect a harsh response from the international community. There will certainly be serious repercussions, undoubtedly stronger than those following North Koreaís missile tests in July. The patience of even North Koreaís closest friends must be wearing thin." Mr Peters said a nuclear test would go against North Koreaís commitments under the Non-Proliferation Treaty and would be contrary to the moratorium on nuclear testing that has been in place for the past eight years. "Any threat to this moratorium would be a threat to us all and a significant step back for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. ďNorth Korea must reconsider its plan and refrain from taking any further rash steps. We urge it to return to dialogue at the earliest possible opportunity,Ē Mr Peters said. [Double standards] [Bizarre]
  • South Korea by Motorcycle
    New Zealander Gareth Morgan finds much to admire in the land of the morning calm
    † Eric Shackle (shack) javascript:memo_send('at_code=362718')javascript:memo_send('at_code=362718') Email Article Print Article † † Published 2006-09-27 12:51 (KST) † More than 70 years ago I rode a tiny two-stroke motorbike along perilous shingle roads on New Zealand's scenic South Island. I reveled in the feel of the wind ruffling my hair (no safety helmets in those days). The bike was belt-driven, similar to the ones that British Army dispatch riders used in World War I. When its leather belt became wet or oily -- as it often did -- it slipped, bringing the machine to a high-revving standstill. It was a real pain in the saddle. Motorbike technology has come on a great deal these days, as New Zealand money guru and travel writer Gareth Morgan would agree. This month 52-year-old Gareth, his wife Joanne, 54-year-old farmer Dave Wallace, and 52-year-old motorcycle dealer Brendan Keogh, have been doing a circuit of South Korea on their motorbikes.

    Floods in the DPRK Ė appeal by Rev Don Borrie

    • Appeal to Prime Minister
      Email from Don Borrie, 25 July 2006
    • Response from Prime Minister
      11 September
    • Don Borrie appeals again
      Dear Helen,
      Thank you for your email of 11 September in reply to mine of 25 July, requesting that the New Zealand Government provide humanitarian assistance to those affected by the recent flooding in the DPR of KoreaÖ.
      We remain convinced that it is only the Government that can make a meaningful contribution to the immediate crisis. We believe that a response will be very favourably viewed by South Korea and China, and most of all by those immediately in need in the DPRK.

  • How New Zealand ended farm subsidies
    † July 24, 2006 ? [First in a series] Agriculture Minister Park Hong-soo said in March that he wants to reform agricultural support programs, using New Zealand's system as a model. "The era where the government gives full support to everything has come to an end," the minister said, as he marked his first year in office. New Zealand is among the world's most competitive countries in agriculture, although in past years it was noted for its huge subsidies to farmers and was far from being able to hold its own internationally. But the government abolished subsidies to farmers in 1984 after New Zealand's economy came close to a breakdown because of their cost. Since then, New Zealand's farming industry has undergone a rigorous restructuring and has become robustly productive. Korean farmers, concerned about the free trade agreement with the United States, could learn much from the changes New Zealand's farming industry has made, and could also learn lessons from a few missteps New Zealand made along the road to reform.
  • New Zealand farmers sacrificed as part of industry overhaul
    † July 24, 2006 ? Jim Sutton, New Zealand's State Minister, said it would be difficult to improve the competitiveness of the nation's agriculture industry with government subsidies. Mr. Sutton said New Zealand learned a valuable lesson by reforming its agriculture industry and stopping government financial support. That move sparked more competition among farmers. A farmer since 1963, Mr. Sutton became a politician in 1984. For six years he contributed to the Labor Party's reform of New Zealand agriculture. After serving as Minister of Agriculture in 1990 and 1999, he became Minister of Forestry in 2002.
  • N Koreans trapped in the past
    THE PRESS, †† 10 JUL 2006, †† Edition 2, † †Page 6. By: EATON Dan
    A New Zealand academic returning from a month in North Korea says its people are living in a time warp, while the country's repressive regime flexes its military muscle. North Korea last week test-fired seven missiles, rattling its neighbours and earning a sharp rebuke from the international community, which is considering sanctions. Lincoln University tourism professor David Simmons said North Koreans were malnourished and enjoyed few of the pleasures of modern life. [Bizarre]
  • Don Borrie on article in The Press
    Published 20 July 2006-07-27
    Dear Editor, ††††††††††††††††Professor David Simmons' article on North Korea, the DPRK,†( Press, 10 July ) accurately reflects the perspective of a western visitor who has yet to establish firm and trusted relationships with North Koreans.
  • Don Borrie on missile tests
    The Editor, Dominion Post, Wellington.
    Dear Editor, When trying to understand the significance of the recent North Korean missile tests readers would be well advised to reflect on events over at least the last fifty years which have involved this much maligned and isolated country in the north Pacific. (letter from Rev Don Borrie)
  • New Zealand effects experts advise Korean moviemakers
    † July 17, 2006 ? The weta, looking like a bizarre blend of a cricket and a cockroach, is one of New Zealand's most ancient species that has survived unchanged since the Mesozoic era. They are nocturnal insects and are said to be considered by many New Zealanders to be repulsive creatures of the dark. The dark can bring many things to light, however. By recreating nightmares, daydreams and a mirage of wayward fairytales and illusive fantasies as actual visual images, New Zealand's Weta Workshop has been responsible for the realization of the visual poignancy and technical craftsmanship of movies such as "The Lord of the Rings," "King Kong" and "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe." †
    The evening was accompanied by a screening of work from Weta Workshop, a selection of New Zealand wines, such as the Villa Maria Private Bin Merlot/Cabernet 2003, and staple New Zealand dishes such as golden kiwi pavlova and New Zealand brie cheese.
  • NZ condemns North Korean tests
    05 July 2006
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters today joined international condemnation over North Korea's missile tests. Mr Peters said the tests showed wanton disregard for the warnings issued by the international community and showed it acting like a rogue state.
    Mr Peters said North Korea was "paranoid" about its security but the tests would only harm its reputation and could be raised at the United Nations Security Council.
    Australian Prime Minister John Howard condemned the act as "extremely provocative" and called on the five nations negotiating with Pyongyang to resolve nuclear tensions on the Korean Peninsula to unite in their condemnation. "I hope that what North Korea has done is condemned as provocative not only by Australia and Japan but also by other countries in the six-power group," he said. "North Korea is in total breach of international obligations in doing this and I hope that North Korea feels isolated and feels the condemnation not only of Australia, the United States and Japan but also of China and naturally of South Korea," he added. [Double standards] [Legality]
  • Missile condemnation reeks of double standards The DominionPost, Wellington, 12 July 2006
    opinion piece by Tim Beal
  • Military Talks With Australia, New Zealand to Be Held
    By Jung Sung-ki Staff Reporter Senior South Korean defense officials will meet their Australian counterparts in Canberra on July 6-7 for working-level talks on military cooperation, the Defense Ministry said Tuesday.
    They will also fly to New Zealand for similar talks with their New Zealand counterparts _ the seventh meeting such since 1999, a ministry official said.
  • Kim Yong Nam Receives Credentials from Ambassador of New Zealand
    Pyongyang, June 21 (KCNA) -- Kim Yong Nam, president of the Presidium of the DPRK Supreme People's Assembly, received credentials from Jane Coombs, ambassador e.p. of New Zealand to the DPRK, at the Mansudae Assembly Hall Wednesday. On hand were Kim Yong Il, vice-minister of Foreign Affairs, and staff members of the embassy of New Zealand. After receiving the credentials Kim Yong Nam had a conversation with the ambassador.
  • DPRK-New Zealand Friendly Meeting Held
    Pyongyang, March 23 (KCNA) -- A friendly meeting took place at the Korea-New Zealand Friendship Haksan Co-operative Farm in Hyongjesan District, Pyongyang, on March 22 on the occasion of the fifth anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the DPRK and New Zealand. Present on invitation were members of the visiting New Zealand-DPRK Association. On hand were members of the Korea-New Zealand Friendship Association and officials of the farm. The guests helped farmers in carrying compost. They appreciated an art performance given by farmers and talked with them about the need to boost the relations between the two countries, deepening the friendship. They handed aid materials to the farm.
  • Regrets over no FTA, but many great memories
    "When I started four years ago I had a full head of hair and no grey hair," New Zealand Ambassador David Taylor jokingly told the Korea Herald before leaving the harsh Korean winter for the green pastures of a Kiwi summer.
    But the humor was simply aimed at masking his emotions about leaving the country he and his wife, Theresa, have called home. Taylor said he is sorry to go, but at least in his new job, he won't be considered a stranger when he makes frequent visits to Seoul.
    "I've met people from all walks of life and all different fields of endeavor. and it was just so much fun. Korea is full of so many lively, interesting people and things to do and see, that it's really hard to leave," he said.
    At 46 years-old, Taylor is returning to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Wellington where he will be Director-General for the North Asia Division, which covers the two Koreas, Japan, China, Taiwan and Mongolia. Even with all the great memories and his tireless work in bringing close relations even closer, his one major regret is leaving without making significant progress on a free trade agreement.
  • Hong Receives NZ Order of Merit
    By Lee Hyo-sik Staff Reporter
    Sonia Hong, head of the New Zealand tourism office in Korea, has been named one of the 2006 recipients for the nation's order of merit for her efforts to promote its image overseas. The order of merit has been awarded every year to non-New Zealand citizens who contribute to improving New Zealand's image abroad since 1996. Hong has become the first employee of New Zealand's tourism offices worldwide to receive the award.
    She is scheduled to fly to Wellington in March to attend an award ceremony.
  • NZ Film Festival 2005
    The festival will screen in Seoul, Jeonju, Gwangju, Daegu and Busan, October-November
  • Goff names new Ambassador to Seoul
    Press Release: New Zealand Government Hon Phil Goff Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade 5 September 2005
    Media statement New Zealand? next Ambassador to South Korea will be career diplomat Jane Coombs, Foreign Minister Phil Goff announced today.
    [In fact, Ms Coombs will also be Ambassador to Pyongyang - Tim Beal]
  • Insecticide detected in New Zealand beef
    September 24, 2005 ? The Ministry of Agriculture said yesterday it had banned beef imports from a New Zealand meat processing plant after residual insecticide beyond permissible levels had been detected. According to the ministry's National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service, beef processed at the plant contained 0.5 parts per million of endosulfan, used to control insects and mites, higher than Korea's permissible level of 0.1 parts per million. If consumed in large quantities, endosulfan can cause vomiting and diarrhea. The ban does not affect beef imports from 32 other plants in New Zealand, the ministry said. A spokesman said the ministry was checking whether beef from the plant was being sold on the market, and would order a recall if it were. This year, 1,622 tons of beef have been imported from the plant.
  • NZ-DPRK Society welcomes 'Fragile Breakthrough in Six Party Talks'
    Press release outlining key aspect of the Joint Statement of 19 September 2005 and calling on NZ Government to support the peace process with practical measures
  • NZ International School Offers English Program
    By Kim Cheong-won Staff Reporter The New Zealand International School opened on Monday in Chonju, North Cholla Province, to offer English teaching programs to elementary school students. The school is the result of the city's ambitious project in seeking to become the nation's foreign language education hub. The school, registered as a language education institute with the Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development, aims to provide various English experiences to its students with its syllabus focusing on child-oriented English courses for five hours a day, five days a week.
    The official opening ceremony is slated for Saturday. New Zealand Ambassador to Korea David Taylor and Chonju Mayor Kim Wan-joo are scheduled to attend the ceremony.
  • Controversy over a giant of the sea
    Despite the ban on commercial whaling, many whales are caught in Korean waters. June 24, 2005 ? The annual whale festival at the Jangsaengpo wharf in Ulsan had a carnival atmosphere, featuring tacky rides and merchants selling goods that bore no relationship to the industry that used to sustain the area. At this year's event, which ended Sunday, a row of temporary restaurants housed in tents was selling whale meat served in two different styles: sashimi or roasted, which tastes like fatty beef. Not far from there was the new Whale Museum and a tent set up by Greenpeace, at which volunteers were body painting whales on children.
    Of course, not everyone is happy with the moratorium on whaling. The Maritime Affairs Ministry and Ulsan city government called for measures to allow whaling again in Korea, and restaurant owners and former whalers in Jangsaengpo want commercial whaling resumed. "These countries ? Britain, the United States, Australia and New Zealand ? are the ones that brought big whales to extinction," said Byeon Chang-myeong, the chairman of a group advocating the resumption of commercial whaling. "They caught whales not for food but for their oil. As whales were no longer needed for their oil [with the development of petroleum and other fuels] and whale oil was no longer profitable, they wanted us to stop whaling too."
  • Australians, New Zealanders Find Home at ANZA
    Interview With Leaders (9) By Yoon Won-sup Staff Reporter If there are any Australians and New Zealanders who are trying to find some place to relax and have fun with likeminded people in Seoul, the Australia and New Zealand Association (ANZA) in Korea offers the perfect answer. The ANZA, which has over 300 members, is a non- profit and social club for Australians and New Zealanders living in Korea. ``The vision of the ANZA is to provide an easygoing and relaxed home for expatriates of Australia and New Zealand while they stay here,'' Annie Sharrock, president of the association, said in an interview with The Korea Times.
  • North Korea - an enigma and an opportunity
    by Major Seth Le Leu
    IT'S easy to assume you know everything about a country from the way it's portrayed in the media. I found out just how wrong that view can be - or, at least, how one-sided - when I travelled to North Korea to see a venture The Salvation Army has entered into.
    North Korea is a beautiful country which, if it were not so isolated, would make a great tourist destination. And if I expected to see an unhappy people, suffering because of their country's isolation, I was in for a surprise.
    The people are industrious and proud. Local communities are entrusted with the upkeep of the roads in their area and everywhere we travelled there were teams of local people engaged in road repairs as part of their community service. It would be a brave mayor in the west who would suggest such a scheme in order to reduce local taxes!
    The country's economy is built on an agricultural foundation which relies on manual labour. Vast numbers of the population work the land and as we travelled we saw the harvest progressing. Teams of people with hand scythes were reaping the precious rice and maize which was loaded onto bullock carts to be taken to the stores.
    Each house in the rural areas had its own garden filled with vegetables, and in many places this produce was on sale from small roadside stalls. However, the North Koreans fear that all this work is not enough to ward off recurrent famine. To this end the government is engaged in a process of diversifying food production.
    For example, on one of the farms we visited ostriches were being farmed and their eggs were on sale in a supermarket in Pyong Yang. Another initiative to enhance food supplies is the establishment of a dairy industry. Dairy products are not a traditional food source in Korea, but for the past six or seven years the North Koreans have been working with the Swiss government to develop goat milk production and products. Children in kindergartens receive yoghurt from the dairy farms and the rest is sold in nearby towns. As people become more accustomed to these products the demand is growing and there is a need to provide machinery to package the yoghurt, which is where The Salvation Army comes in.
    Major Seth Le Leu is a New Zealand Officer serving as International Development Secretary, London.
  • New Zealand gives NZ$400,000 to World Food Programme
  • FM Ban Meets New Zealand Counterpart
    WELLINGTON (Yonhap) _ Foreign Minister Ban Ki-moon met his New Zealand counterpart Friday and discussed ways to increase economic and other cooperation, officials said. Ban briefed Phil Goff on recent security developments on the Korean Peninsula, including the North Korean nuke issue, and asked for support for Seoul's efforts to resolve the dispute peacefully. Goff proposed an early conclusion of a free trade agreement between the two countries, but Ban replied that Seoul wants to discuss the issue over a longer period of time. New Zealand is the second leg of Ban's three-nation trip, which also includes stops in Thailand and Australia. He is the first South Korean foreign minister to visit Australia and New Zealand in 27 years.
  • FM Ban Embarks on Foreign Tour
    By Yoon Won-sup Staff Reporter Foreign Affairs-Trade Minister Ban Ki-moon Tuesday embarked on an eight-day tour of Thailand, New Zealand and Australia. Ban will discuss North Korea's nuclear weapons programs, economic cooperation and pending bilateral issues with top officials in the countries he is to visit. He will pay courtesy calls on Prime Ministers Helen Clark of New Zealand and John Howard of Australia. He is also to hold talks with his counterparts Sathiratahai Surakiart of Thailand, Phil Goff of New Zealand, and Alexander Downer of Australia. On the first leg of the tour in Bangkok Aug 24- 25, Ban will sign an agreement on cooperation in culture and education with Thailand. While in Australia Aug. 28-31, he will sign a pact on cooperation in energy and mineral resources. In addition, Ban will deliver speeches at the Australian press club and the New Zealand Chamber of Commerce. When meeting with representatives of Korean residents living in the three countries, the minister will explain the Seoul government's recent policies and promote business opportunities. The trip is the first by a South Korean foreign minister to New Zealand and Australia in 27 years since 1977, and is aimed at consolidating bilateral relations.
  • More Koreans Head to Australia, New Zealand
    By Seo Dong-shin Staff Reporter The number of overseas [South] Koreans residing in nations in the Asia-Pacific region other than China and Japan surged to some 196,000 by July 2003, an increase of 37.4 percent from July 2001, according to statistics released by the Foreign Affairs-Trade Ministry. The jump can mainly be attributed to the large number of Koreans who emigrated to Australia or New Zealand over the period.

  • New Zealand to support UNICEF in North Korea
    26 April 2004
    New Zealand is providing NZ$540,000 to the United Nations Children's Fund, UNICEF, for its programme in North Korea, says Foreign Minister Phil Goff.
  • DPRK-New Zealand Friendship School Designated
    Pyongyang, April 12 (KCNA) -- Pyongyang June 9 Taesong Middle School No. 1 was designated as DPRK-New Zealand Friendship SchoolĀ@with due ceremony today. Present there on invitation were Don Borrie, chairman of the New Zealand-DPRK Society, and its secretary on a visit to the DPRK.
    Present there were Vice-Chairman of the Korean Committee for Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries Jon Yong Jin who is chairman f the DPRK-New Zealand Friendship Association and other officials concerned, teachers and students of this school.
    Congratulatory speeches were made by the two chairmen.
    At the end of the ceremony its participants talked to one another about the need to boost the friendly relations between the two cuntries and enjoyed an art performance given by students.

    DPRK train explosion

  • Letter to PM Helen Clark urging emergency aid
  • Letter to Kim Jong Il expressing condolences

  • DPRK-New Zealand Friendship Farm Designated
    Pyongyang, March 27 (KCNA) -- The Haksan Co- operative Farm in Hyongjesan District, Pyongyang, was designated as the DPRK-New Zealand Friendship Farm with due ceremony yesterday on the occasion of the third anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the two countries. Jon Yong Jin, vice-chairman of the Korean Committee for Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries who is chairman of the DPRK-New Zealand Friendship Association, and other officials concerned were present at the ceremony. The chairman of the Management Board of the Farm declared the farm was named the DPRK-New Zealand Friendship Farm. After hearing a congratulatory speech made by the chairman of the friendship association, the participants looked round photos and books introducing New Zealand.
  • NZ artists to perform in 2004 April Spring Friendship Arts festival in Pyongyang
    Stories about the April Spring Friendship Arts festival in previous years

  • NZ's donation to World Food Programme for North Korea welcomed
    Rev Don Borrie, Chairman of the NZ-DPRK Society welcomes the NZ government's donation of US$250,000 to the World Food Programme activities in DPR Korea
  • 2 nations pledge food as aid to North Korea
    Responding to a World Food Program appeal for more aid to North Korea, New Zealand and Germany have said that they would provide additional supplies, AFP reported yesterday. New Zealand will donate $256,000 to the UN relief agency to help the famine-stricken communist country, Prime Minister Helen Clark reportedly said. Germany has offered 3 million euros ($3.84 million) to the UN operations in the North, the German aid ministry said.
  • NZ to give $370,000 in aid to North Korea
    Miss Clark made her announcement on a week that the Council for International Development (CID) launched a campaign to increase New Zealand's contribution to overseas aid. New Zealand currently contributes only 0.22 per cent of gross national income (GNI) to overseas aid and the campaign aims to increase that to 0.7 per cent by 2015. - NZPA
  • New Zealand supports North Korean food programme
    Rt. Hon Helen Clark 13 February 2004
    Prime Minister Helen Clark said today that New Zealand would contribute around $370,000 (US$250,000) to the United Nations World Food Programme's operations in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
  • NZ-DPRK Society asks NZ PM to support WFP
    Dear Ms. Clark, In view of the World Food Programmes' public declaration that they are being obliged to severely restrict food aid to the most needy in the DPR of Korea, on behalf of our Society I ask that the New Zealand Government make an emergency grant to the WFP DPRK aid project. In yesterday's appeal, which I am enclosing, the WFP Representative said that "Over four million core beneficiaries - the most vulnerable children, women and elderly people - are now deprived of very vital rations."
    In previous occasions the Government has responded to calls for an emergency response to a crisis in the basic food requirements in the DPRK. Given that this is in the middle of severe winter cold Korean people are now at their most vulnerable. Apart from donations of cereals, such as that coming from the US, the EU, Australia and Canada, I feel that New Zealand should be in a position to provide dried milk powder.
    Don Borrie, Chairman
  • Greens compliment this site
    While we are all agonising over the Middle East...what exactly has been going on in North Korea? Eight years ago Jimmy Carter brokered an agreement between Washington and Pyongyang in which the US engaged to help North Korea build less dangerous nuclear reactors, to normalise relations with the DPRK, and to sign an agreement promising not to make a pre-emptive nuclear strike against North Korea. None of these things have happened - and indeed the Bush Administration has since named North Korea as one of the countries that it would consider launching a pre-emptive nuclear strike against. You won't get the full story in the Murdoch media - go instead to www.vuw.ac.nz/~caplabtb/dprk/ - where Tim Beal regularly updates a site on North Korea which now includes a separate section of latest news links on the nuclear programme.
    You can subscribe to the Green's free email nesletter by emailing christine.dann@clear.net.nz
  • Photographs of Ambassador David Taylor presenting credentials in Pyongyang
  • Nats urge action over North Korea
    [NPT]
  • Peek inside the Hermit Kingdom
    {Graham Reid}
  • The new DPRK Ambassador, Chon Jae Hong, was in Wellington 9-15 December to present credentials
  • New Zealand threatens to suspend aid to North Korea over nuclear arms program -AP
    [Nuclear]
  • Kim Yong Nam receives credentials from New Zealand Ambassador
  • Photographs of presentation
  • New Zealand Ambassador to Visit N.K. Late This Month
    [Training]
  • THE HUMAN FACE
    Address by the Executive Director of Asia 2000 Foundation on NZ-Korea relations {Christopher Butler}

  • DPRK business delegation visits NZ
  • 3 foreign envoys present credentials [in ROK, includes NZ's David Taylor]
  • Goff welcomes progress in inter-Korean relations

  • Letter from NZ-DPRK Society to Prime Minister Helen Clark
  • Korean-American League endorses letter to Clark

  • Diplomacy needed on North Korea, Iran: Clark
  • NZ Ambassador Named Honorary Tourism Envoy [ROK]
  • NZ grant to UNICEF to support education in DPRK
Ambassadors present credentials NZ Delegation to DPRK, July 2001 Other stories

NZ and DPRK establish diplomatic relations
26 March 2001

  • NZ Ambassador to ROK, Roy Ferguson, on NZ perspectives on Korea

  • Goff to talk on N Korean links

  • Korea New Zealand Business Council calls for prompt establishment of diplomatic relations with DPRK

  • DPRK proposes diplomatic relations to New Zealand

  • NZ Associate FM Matt Robson urges establishment of diplomatic relations with DPRK

  • Call for New Zealand to normalise relations with DPRK
    Press release 17 January 2000 Visit of Ambassador Kim Pyong Hong to NZ, July 1999
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